Anti-Depressants May Increase Suicide Risk In Children, Teenagers and Young Adults

Sucide-depression-pillsIt’s been known for a long time that when people with depression are treated with antidepressants, their risks of committing suicide can actually increase, at least initially.

It’s thought that one of the causes of this is because highly suicidal people are often so depressed that they don’t have the energy to go through with attempting suicide. However, when they start taking antidepressants, sometimes they will start to feel more energy before they actually start to feel less depressed, therefore they now have both the thought to commit suicide and the energy to do it.

Recently, a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine explored the effects of antidepressants on children and young adults and found that they too have an increased risk of suicide when they first start on antidepressants, perhaps even more so than older people, especially when given selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).

SSRI antidepressants can increase suicidal thinking and behavior in children, teenagers and young adults which is why the Food and Drug Administration issued a warning about the risk in 2004 after various independent studies showed a higher rate of suicides and suicide attempts among children and teenagers taking SSRI antidepressants .

The risk of suicide was most severe for those young people who started taking antidepressants at higher than average doses. They were twice as likely to attempt suicide when compared to those taking an average dose.

Than why are SSRI antidepressants being used? It’s because many think the benefits of them far outweigh the risk since the medication eventually lessens the risk of anxiety, depression and suicidal thoughts and behaviors. In most cases, SSRI antidepressants work really well and can be life savers, but there are risks that every parent should know about including the risk of increased suicidal thoughts.

People under 25 who were started on a higher than recommended dose of SSRI antidepressants were twice as likely to attempt suicide, especially in the first three months of starting them.

You may be asking, why then do doctors prescribe a higher dose than necessary?

In the study, almost 20 percent of the people had been given an initial prescription for higher than recommended doses. Part of the reason why is often times doctors including psychiatrist, play a guessing game when prescribing medication. They often don’t know what doses will be effective for a person and often don’t follow guidelines. They start people off with a dose that may be too much or too little and count on them to come back and let them know if it’s working or if they are having too many side effects. Then they will decide if they should increase the dose, decrease it or change the medication all together.

I’ve worked in the mental health field long enough to know that psychiatry is often a guessing game and anyone who has been on psych medications before can attest to this. Many patients often tell me they feel like the psychiatrist is using them as a Guinea pig because they keep trying different medications and doses of medications out on them. In all fairness, usually psychiatrist do this to see what works best for the patient, but often time the patient is left feeling an experiment and may even stop seeking help.

I’ve included a great Ted Talk video on psychiatry that talks about the importance of looking at individual brains instead of playing guessing games when it comes to treating people. Not everyone who has depression or anxiety or any other mental illness should be treated in the same way with the same drugs or with the same therapy, but in psychiatry and the mental health field in general, that is often the case.

If you or your child is depressed and thinking about getting on an anti-depressant, make sure you talk to your doctor, read the black box warnings and ask the important questions so that you will be informed and also know what warning signs to look for. antidepressants have worked wonders for many, but for some they have also been tragically bad.

 

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