The Face of Mental Illness

girl-in-shadows-istockI love working in a psychiatric hospital because it’s rarely boring. The type of people who come through the door are everyday people, no different from you or me, it’s just that what they are dealing with at the time is more than they or most likely any of us can handle.

I remember when I first started working here, a senior co-worker said that the only thing separating us from the patients is that we have the keys that let us in and out.

That’s one reason customer service, even in a mental hospital is so important. We strive on treating everyone, no matter what their circumstances or mental state, fairly and therapeutically because you never know when we or one of our family members or friends will end up in a place like this and it’s fairly easy.

Say the “magic words” to the right person and you may find yourself involuntarily hospitalized. Have an over exaggerated emotional or behavioral reaction and you may end up placed in a mental hospital to help you calm down.

Since I’ve been here I’ve seen correction officers, police officers, teachers, college students, professional athletes, lawyers, daughters of politicians, doctors, nurses and business owners come through our doors under involuntary hospitalization statuses.

People are placed here everyday who feel like they shouldn’t be and some may very well not be, but the majority at least need a cool down period.

For example, last week a college student got into a fight with his girlfriend and someone reported he threatened to kill himself. He denied does accusations, but he was emotionally upset enough that law enforcement thought it was best that he was brought here for his safety and the safety of those around him.

Now that he was here he didn’t want to be here and wanted to leave. He kept trying to convince me and everyone that he didn’t need to be here, but in doing so, he was getting more and more upset and therefore appearing more and more like he needed to be here for his safety and those around him.

I kept trying to talk to him and tell him that if he truly didn’t think he should be hospitalized then he needed to be calm and relaxed, otherwise he was risking looking like every other patient in the hospital who truly needed to be there.

However, he was so agitated and insistent on leaving that we had to place him on an elopement risk which lessened the chance of him being released sooner than he would have been otherwise.

When people think of the patients in a mental hospital, they almost automatically get an image in their head as if mental illness has a face. Those of us who work in the field or know someone or are ourselves suffering from a mental illness know that this couldn’t be further from the truth.

This morning I spoke with the mother of one of our patients who just graduated with an advanced degree and has an extremely high IQ, but has a long history of bipolar disorder and hasn’t been on her medication in over a year.

This is a beautiful young lady who was found sitting outside naked, stating that her old self had died and given birth to her new self with a new name she was calling herself by and a new age. She also believed she had God like powers.

Here at the hospital, for the most part, this young lady was selectively mute and at times appeared catatonic. We even had to carry and pose her limp body at one point when we had to transport her to another part of our facility.

She was definitely in need of some medication to help her start getting back to her “normal” self.

I was really hoping to speak with her, I throughly enjoy talking to people who both have a long history of mental illness and the ability and awareness to really talk about it and analyze their experiences, but she wasn’t speaking to anyone, so I spoke with her mother for a while about her history of treatment and tried to help calm her mother’s fears about her daughter’s recent deterioration.

This young lady reminds me that mental illness is all around us and it’s nothing to be ashamed of or to run from. Sometimes it’s in your face like the guy talking to himself while begging for change or it’s wrapped in the package of a pretty grad school graduate who on most days could hold the most intellectual conversations, but today she’s just staring into out of space unresponsive to the world around her.

 

3 thoughts on “The Face of Mental Illness

  1. Wow, great post.
    As a sufferer of mental illness myself it really hit home. It’s amazing how many people suffer from some type of mental illness but you would never know because they look/act like everyone else. I recently found out one of my old best friends was on anti-depressants for over a year and I had no idea.

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